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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of series of monumental brasses from the 13th to the 16th century found in the catalog.

series of monumental brasses from the 13th to the 16th century

John Green Waller

series of monumental brasses from the 13th to the 16th century

by John Green Waller

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  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Phillips & Page in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Brasses -- Great Britain,
  • Sepulchral monuments -- Great Britain,
  • Great Britain -- Biography.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementdrawn & engraved by J.G. & L.A.B. Waller, 1864 ; reprinted 1975 with corrections and additions by J.A. Goodall.
    ContributionsWaller, L. A. B., Goodall, J. A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsNB1842 .W3 1975
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxi, xiii, [65] p., 6 p. of plates :
    Number of Pages65
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16490444M
    ISBN 100950394203

    BOOK REVIEW: William Lack, H Martin Stuchfield & Philip Whittemore (eds). The Monumental Brasses of Cumberland and Westmorland. (Monumental Brass Society. £ + £ p+p. May ISBN 0 4 3). xvi, pages. 78 illus.; bibliography; indexes; stiff paper covers. Monumental brasses, produced in large numbers from the 13th through the 17th centuries, serve as a fascinating window into those eras. They fulfilled three functions: soliciting prayers for the deceased, preserving their memory and attesting to their social status. These figures illuminate the history of heraldry, armor and costume.

    Title in red and black. Addeddate Bookplateleaf Call number brasses, monumental, or sepulchral brasses, memorials to the dead, in use in churches on the Continent and in England in the 13th cent. and for several centuries following. They a.

    Get this from a library! English church brasses: from the 13th to the 17th century,. [Ernest R Suffling]. Comprehensive list of the memorial brasses found in the British Isles, based upon the work of Herbert Haines but with additions. With a detailed Index over pages, some annotation to text, included two typed rather scholarly essays on Monumental Brasses in Cornwall etc, presumably by the previous owner Emile De St. Paer-Gotch.


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Series of monumental brasses from the 13th to the 16th century by John Green Waller Download PDF EPUB FB2

A series of monumental brasses from the 13th to the 16th century [Waller, John Green] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : John Green Waller. A Series Of Monumental Brasses, From The Thirteenth To The Sixteenth Century. Drawn And Engraved By J.G. Monumental brasses were first seen in the 13th century.

The Rhineland was a major source of brass (latten) through the 16th century, specifically in Cologne. It is not surprising that brasses seem to have originated in the Low Countries: lands around the Rhine's delta that roughly correspond to modern-day Belgium, Luxemburg, and the Netherlands.

Apr 1, - Explore Peter Walker's board "Monumental Brasses" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Effigy, Medieval, Medieval art pins. English brasses in the 13th and 14th centuries can be identified by the fact that the figure commemorated is usually cut out to the outline whereas the European examples are more often engraved on a plain rectangle.

By the 15th century designs became standardised suggesting brasses were the products of a few large workshops. Brasses commemorating children were far more common than sculpted monuments until James I and V I commemorated two small daughters early in the seventeenth-century.

Thereafter monumental sculpture memorialising children became much more frequent. A late sixteenth-century example of a brass to a child can be found in Brightling church in Sussex. Margaret Camoys, Trotton The craft of engraving a memorial into a sheet of brass and letting it into a stone slab began in the early 13th century and reached its zenith in the 14th, when the classic brasses of knights in armour and ladies in wimples were produced.

Lord and Lady Camoys. Brasses were popular form of grave marker used to cover the tombs of people buried inside churches, particularly between and Fewer brasses were made in the 17th and 18th centuries, but there was a resurgence of interest in the 19th century as a by-product of the Anglo-Catholic revival, and some are still made today.

Use BRASS. PAS object classification to be used. Use ‘monumental’ in the Classification field. Medieval (and early post-medieval) monumental brasses Terms to use in the description. Occasionally brasses, cut from sheet plate, will have been engraved on both sides.

Such recycled brasses are. Memorial brasses were made throughout Europe from the 13th until nearly the end of the 17th century. The practice was revived in the 19th century. Brasses were fitted onto the lids of tombs and memorial slabs to commemorate the lives of the deceased.

Brass or latten (copper alloy) memorials were a cheaper alternative to sculpted stone memorials. Brass of Margaret Wode (d. ) {BabelStone CC BY-SA } Margaret Wode (died 5 December ) was the wife of Thomas Wode (a justice of Common Pleas), and previously wife of Robert Lenham (d. ), lord of the Manor of Tidmarsh.

Brass of a knight in 16th-century style armour {BabelStone CC BY-SA }. Monumental Brass Society use cookies to make the site run smoothly and to power functions. We also store anonymised information on how you use our site in order to improve your experience. These cookies are safe and secure and will never contain any sensitive information.

Find the perfect english medieval monumental brass brasses stock photo. Huge collection, amazing choice, + million high quality, affordable RF and RM images. No need to register, buy now. The Conservation and Repair of Ecclesiastical Buildings, Author. WILLIAM LACK BSc, MIMM, CEng is a conservator of monumental brasses who has worked on about brasses over the last 18 years.

In his spare time he is co-author, with Philip Whittemore and H Martin Stuchfield, of the ‘County Series’ on brasses. A Series of Monumental Brasses, Indents and Incised Slabs from the 13th to the 20th Century: Volume 3, part 3 (Book) William Lack £ Book.

A monumental brass is a type of engraved sepulchral memorial which in the 13th century began to partially take the place of three-dimensional monuments and effigies carved in stone or wood. Made of hard latten or sheet brass, let into the pavement, and thus forming no obstruction in the space required for the services of the church, they speedily came into general use, and continued to be a favourite style of sepulchral memorial.

A well-known 13th-century example is that of Sir Roger de Trumpington (c. ), who accompanied Prince Edward in his expedition to Palestine and is represented cross-legged.

About half a dozen instances of this peculiarity are known. The 14th-century brasses are much more numerous, and present a remarkable variety in their details. Sir Hugh Hastings,Elsing, Norfolk, English medieval monumental brass effigy brasses effigies England UK 14th century Black purbeck ledger with crossed keys and victorian brass inlaid cross on the floor of the retrochoir in Wells Cathedral.

In the 15th century the design and execution of monumental brasses had attained their highest excellence. The beautiful brass of Thomas Beauchamp, earl of Warwick (d. ), and his wife Margaret, which formerly covered the tomb in St Mary’s church, Warwick, is a striking example.

Such monumental brasses can be minutely small, or larger than life size. This style of memorial first gained popularity in Britain during the 13th century, and remained in use until well into the 16th century.

john, brasses, sir, sons, brass, son, canopy, engraved, tbe, going, sir john, eldest son, sir hugh, sir thomas, triple canopy, monumental brasses, incised slabs, incised slab, good examples, fine triple Publisher Adams & Dart Collection europeanlibraries Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of Oxford University Language English.- Explore Pamela Nelson's board "Monumental Brasses; Brass Rubbing", followed by people on Pinterest.

See more ideas about Effigy, Brass, Medieval pins.Monumental brass is a species of engraved sepulchral memorial which in the early part of the 13th century began to partially take the place of three-dimensional monuments and effigies carved in stone or wood.

Made of hard latten or sheet brass, let into the pavement, and thus forming no obstruction in the space required for the services of the church, they speedily came into general use, and.