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2 edition of Effect of time on clinical efficacy of topical anaesthesia found in the catalog.

Effect of time on clinical efficacy of topical anaesthesia

Jasdev Bhalla

Effect of time on clinical efficacy of topical anaesthesia

by Jasdev Bhalla

  • 289 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published in 2007 .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.)--University of Toronto, 2007

The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 92 leaves
Number of Pages92
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19578283M

In total, 25 RCTs, including 3, participants, were included in this review. Trials evaluating the analgesic efficacy of topical local anesthetics during skin laceration repair were included, specifically those comparing topical agents with infiltration agents, and those comparing different topical . efficacy of several new topical anesthetic agents. Using the methodology of this study, in which the anesthetics were ap-plied under occlusion, ELA-Max and EMLA were the superior anesthetics after a minute application time and 30 minutes later. In addition, there was a clinical increase in efficacy sug-.

Bhalla J, Meechan JG, Lawrence HP, Grad HA, Haas DA () Effect of time on clinical efficacy of topical anesthesia. Anesth Prog Link: ; Roller NW, Ship II () Lidocaine topical film strip for oral mucosal biopsies. J Oral Med Link: Choosing a topical anesthetics The effectiveness of topical anaesthesia is dependent on: Optimal application time Application technique The volume of topical anaesthesia applied to the skin. Refer to the table below comparing the characteristics of the 2 topical anesthetic agents used at RCH []. Topical anaesthesia agent.

riptyline found signs of toxicity at concentrations below mM/L (%) and the current hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of amitriptyline toxicity suggests it might be safe at low concentrations while still having relevant clinical effects. Hence, we conducted this study to assess the clinical and histological toxicity of intraspinal amitriptyline at the lowest dosages previously. Background: We designed this randomized, double-blind clinical study to compare the safety and efficacy of 2% and 4% lidocaine during airway topical anesthesia with a spray-as-you-go technique via the fiberoptic bronchoscope. Methods: Fifty-two adult patients with a difficult airway were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 study groups to receive 2% (Group 1) or 4% lidocaine (Group 2) by a spray-as.


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Effect of time on clinical efficacy of topical anaesthesia by Jasdev Bhalla Download PDF EPUB FB2

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of time on the clinical efficacy of topical anesthetic in reducing pain from needle insertion alone as well as injection of anesthetic.

This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, split-mouth, clinical trial which enrolled 90 subjects, equally divided into 3 groups based upon Cited by: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of time on the clinical efficacy of topical anesthetic in reducing pain from needle insertion alone as well as injection of anesthetic.

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of time on the clinical efficacy of topical anesthetic in reducing pain from needle insertion alone as well as injection of by: Effect of Time on Clinical Efficacy of Topical Anesthesia. Similar to the results of the present study, several investigations have shown that use of topical anesthesia has no significant effect on pain during either needle penetration or anesthetic solution injections 3, 4, In contrast, other studies have been in favor of using topical anesthesia Cited by:   The first aim was to simultaneously investigate the effects of topical anesthesia on needle insertion and injection pain in the labial mucosa of maxillary central incisors in real patients.

The second aim was to assess the relationship between patients' anxiety and pain scores during dental injections and topical anesthesia administration. The literature shows that there is little pain relief from topical anesthesia, and one reason for failure may be that dentists do not wait long enough to allow them to take effect.

1, 2 Studies in the past have looked more into the clinical effectiveness of various topical anesthetics than on the effect of application time.

Remarkably, despite the wide use of topical anaesthetics, the clinical value of applying topical anaesthesia to reduce dental injection pain is controversial.

Some trials have shown that the use of topical anaesthetics does not significantly reduce the needle insertion pain or the LA deposition pain, even when used in the anterior maxi   The application time for both the topical anesthetic and the placebo was 2 minutes. One study, by Bhalla et al, 8 evaluated the time of application of topical anesthetic and concluded that the period of 2 minutes is sufficient for proper action of the products on the tissues.

The needles used in this study for administration of local anesthesia. Effect of time on. clinical efficacy of topical anesthesia. gov/books/NBK/ (accessed ) StatPearls. Jayasuriya NSS, Weerapperuma ID, Amarasinghe MGCK.

The use of an iced. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of time on the clinical efficacy of topical anesthetic in reducing pain from needle insertion alone as well as injection of anesthetic.

This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, split-mouth, clinical trial which enrolled 90 subjects, equally divided into 3 groups based upon time (2, 5, or 10 minutes) of topical anesthetic.

Topical anaesthesia does not guarantee completely pain-free injections, and the efficacy is dependent on several factors such as time (injection speed) and gauge size of the needle. Some authors have stated that lidocaine 5% gel only relieves pain caused by the needle insertion, but not the pain caused by the actual injection, unless a min.

Our aim was to describe a new simple method for topical anaesthesia of oral mucosa and to compare the effectiveness of ice and lidocaine 5% gel for topical anaesthesia of oral mucosa. Anesthetic latency time: this was defined as the period immediately after injecting the anesthetic to the onset of anesthetic effect.

The absence of sensitivity to the electrical stimulus in two cycles of 80 mA confirmed the beginning of the effect and pulpal anesthetic efficacy and defined the latency time measured in 2 and 5 minutes.

Background: Hospitalised newborn neonates frequently undergo painful invasive procedures that involve penetration of the skin and other tissues by a needle.

One intervention that can be used prior to a needle insertion procedure is application of a topical local anaesthetic. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical anaesthetics such as amethocaine and EMLA in newborn term or.

Local anesthesia is a fundamental method of pain control during dental treatment. However, the pain that accompanies the process of local anesthesia itself frequently causes fear of dental treatment and may provoke vasovagal syncope 1, 2, hyperventilation attack, and other adverse are 2 types of pain during local anesthesia.

This is a study of the effect of time on the effectiveness of topical anesthetics in the mouth. The Null Hypothesis is: Regardless of the time of application over a minute period, there is no difference in the clinical effectiveness of the topical anesthetic 5% lidocaine on (a) the pain of needle stick insertion and (b) the pain of local.

TOPICAINE skin numbing topical anesthetic with lidocaine in a soothing, cooling gel. It numbs the skin with rapid onset and proven efficacy. Independent clinical studies found it has a skin numbing effect better than EMLA and LMX Made in USA; OTC. Topical anaesthesia is important to optimize pain control during dental injection.

Our aim was to describe a new simple method for topical anaesthesia of oral mucosa and to compare the effectiveness of ice and lidocaine 5% gel for topical anaesthesia of oral mucosa. A total of 40 patients aged – years were included. The side and method of application were both randomized.

The aim of this study was the evaluation of efficacy of this technique in increasing the effect of topical anesthesia in the oral als and methodsOn 20 volunteers, half of the lower. Topical anaesthetics.

Topical anaesthetics are used for procedures such as vein cannulation, laceration repair to avoid infiltrative local anaesthesia injections and associated pain. They are widely used in the paediatric population. There are many dosage forms in clinical use, for example, gels, sprays, creams, ointments, patches.

8. Sveen OB, Yaekel M, Adair SM: Efficacy of using benzo- caine for temporary relief of toothache. ORAL SURG9. Ping RS, White JG, Spear LB: Dyclonine hydrochloride as a topical anesthetic in dentistry.

ORAL SURGAdriani J, Zapernick R: Clinical effectiveness of drugs used for topical anesthesia.Introduction: Intraoral topical local anesthetic is used to reduce the discomfort of injection. Objectives: To determine the effect of time on the clinical efficacy of the topical anesthetic 5% lidocaine; to determine whether it is as effective in reducing pain in the palate upon injection compared with needle insertion alone and; to correlate.